Chicago Western Suburbs Edition
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Veggie Fest Adds New Attraction

Veggie Fest Chicago will be held this year from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m., August 12 and 13, at Benedictine University. Yoga classes are a new feature this year, in addition to coupon books for thousands of dollars of merchandise redeemable at local vendors and the opportunity to take the popular 14-day vegetarian challenge.

Not-to-be-missed keynote speakers on healthy living include Kim Allan Williams, Sr., M.D., past president of the American College of Cardiology and chief of the division of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center; and Terry Mason, M.D., chief operating officer of the Cook County Department of Public Health.

One of the largest vegetarian food and lifestyle festivals in North America, Veggie Fest includes a huge international food court; health professionals speaking on diet, lifestyle and environmental issues; engaging food demonstrations by restaurant owners, chefs and authors; a children’s tent with face painting, clowns and crafts; live music from some of Chicago’s best bands; and more than 100 vendor booths to explore.

Admission and parking is free. Location: 5700 College Rd., Lisle, IL. For more information, visit VeggieFestChicago.org.

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